Henry Darger House Studio
Henry Darger House Studio

Henry Darger House Studio

Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Francis Davis Millet 1907
Francis Davis Millet 1907

Summary

Shows Millet (standing) at work, in his 1256 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington, DC, studio which he called his Art Factory. 
Mural is The history of shipping from the earliest recorded use of boats until the present time which was installed in the Baltimore Customs House in 1908. 
Identification on verso (handwritten): F.D. Millet Studio working on ceiling.
Outer edge of photograph has framing damage.

Citation

Francis Davis Millet and assistants working on a mural, 1907 / unidentified photographer. Francis Davis Millet and Millet family papers, 1858-1984, bulk 1858-1955. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Use Note

U.S. public domain

Location Note

Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. 20560

Christo in his New York studio, 1988.
Christo in his New York studio, 1988.

Christo in his New York studio, 1988. Behind Christo are preparatory works for The Umbrellas.

Photo: Wolfgang Volz.

Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Christo in his studio 2012
Christo in his studio 2012

Christo in his studio with a preparatory drawing for "The Mastaba," 2012

Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio

There’s another side to the story, though. In 1968, de Saint Phalle wrote on a drawing, “I had to take my diet pills … gained five pounds around the hips.” On another drawing of a Nana she asks, “will you still love me when I look like this?” The artist was a slim woman who modeled for Life magazine when she was 19, Vogue when she was 22. Following a conventional trajectory, she married at 19, had her first child at 21, and her second at 25. At 23 she had a nervous breakdown and was treated with electroshock therapy and insulin for what was diagnosed as schizophrenia.

When she was 62 de Saint Phalle published Mon Secret. She revealed that her father sexually abused her for several years beginning when she was 11 years old. Knowing this, all her works take on new meanings and what seemed like contradictory urges — the guns, the sad and sullen wives and mothers, the enormous, rollicking Nanas — take their places in a cohesive narrative. The raging critiques of the early works transform into the reveling forms of the fat Nanas, and later into de Saint Phalle’s jubilant, sometimes macabre parks all over the world. Their size and colors resemble a kind of voodoo against malevolent spirits.

quoted from 

The Darkness Behind Niki De Saint Phalle’s Colorful Beauties

Eunice Lipton January 26, 2015

Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Edward Hopper
Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper (07/22/1882 - 05/15/1967) in his studio.

Henry Darger House Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Francis Davis Millet 1907
Christo in his New York studio, 1988.
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Christo in his studio 2012
Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Edward Hopper
Henry Darger House Studio

Henry Darger House Studio

Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Joan Miro Studio
Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Francis Davis Millet 1907

Summary

Shows Millet (standing) at work, in his 1256 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington, DC, studio which he called his Art Factory. 
Mural is The history of shipping from the earliest recorded use of boats until the present time which was installed in the Baltimore Customs House in 1908. 
Identification on verso (handwritten): F.D. Millet Studio working on ceiling.
Outer edge of photograph has framing damage.

Citation

Francis Davis Millet and assistants working on a mural, 1907 / unidentified photographer. Francis Davis Millet and Millet family papers, 1858-1984, bulk 1858-1955. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Use Note

U.S. public domain

Location Note

Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. 20560

Christo in his New York studio, 1988.

Christo in his New York studio, 1988. Behind Christo are preparatory works for The Umbrellas.

Photo: Wolfgang Volz.

Yves Klein & Jean Tinguely
Christo in his studio 2012

Christo in his studio with a preparatory drawing for "The Mastaba," 2012

Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio

There’s another side to the story, though. In 1968, de Saint Phalle wrote on a drawing, “I had to take my diet pills … gained five pounds around the hips.” On another drawing of a Nana she asks, “will you still love me when I look like this?” The artist was a slim woman who modeled for Life magazine when she was 19, Vogue when she was 22. Following a conventional trajectory, she married at 19, had her first child at 21, and her second at 25. At 23 she had a nervous breakdown and was treated with electroshock therapy and insulin for what was diagnosed as schizophrenia.

When she was 62 de Saint Phalle published Mon Secret. She revealed that her father sexually abused her for several years beginning when she was 11 years old. Knowing this, all her works take on new meanings and what seemed like contradictory urges — the guns, the sad and sullen wives and mothers, the enormous, rollicking Nanas — take their places in a cohesive narrative. The raging critiques of the early works transform into the reveling forms of the fat Nanas, and later into de Saint Phalle’s jubilant, sometimes macabre parks all over the world. Their size and colors resemble a kind of voodoo against malevolent spirits.

quoted from 

The Darkness Behind Niki De Saint Phalle’s Colorful Beauties

Eunice Lipton January 26, 2015

Niki De Saint Phalle in her studio
Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper (07/22/1882 - 05/15/1967) in his studio.

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© 2017 Marcii Goosen